Latar Belakang Paris Agreement

A new global agreement on climate change was reached on 12 December. The agreement is a balanced outcome, with an action plan to limit global warming to “well below” 2°C and to continue efforts to limit it to 1.5°C. Dutch Environment Minister and Council President Sharon Dijksma and European Commission Vice-President Maroš Šefčovič sign the agreement on behalf of the EU at a high-level ceremony in New York, USA. The Paris Agreement provides a sustainable framework that guides global efforts for decades to come. The goal is to increase countries` climate goals over time. To promote this situation, the agreement provides for two review processes of a five-year cycle each. The Paris Climate Conference took place from 30 November to 12 December 2015. It was the 21st. Meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP 21) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the 11th Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP 11). Delegations from around 150 countries participated in the negotiations for a new global and legally binding agreement on climate change. Representatives of the Presidency of the Council and of the European Commission deposited the official ratification documents with the Secretary-General of the United Nations, depositary of the agreement. Each year, the Parties to the UNFCCC meet to review and review progress on the Agreement, related agreements and their implementation. The Presidency represents the EU in these international forums, known as the “United Nations Climate Change Conferences” (or Co-Conferences of the Parties).

Prior to the Paris Climate Change Conference, the EU submitted its National Contribution (INDC) to the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The EU`s INDC expresses the EU`s commitment to the negotiation process for a new legally binding agreement on climate change to keep global warming below 2°C. It also confirmed the binding target of reducing national greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40% by 2030 compared to 1990, as set out in the European Council conclusions of October 2014. To contribute to the objectives of the agreement, countries presented broad national climate change plans (national contributions, NDCs). . . .